Recipes

Chicken Marsala

September 15, 2016

Chicken Marsala fixins

I am going to be very honest with you all right now: I have no clue what I’m doing. To clarify, with this blog. I go through burst of productivity where I get a lot done. And then I go through periods where nothing happens at all. I honestly don’t know how so many people are able to balance a full time job whilst also running a food blog that is updated regularly. There must be some black magic afoot. Or maybe if I watched less Big Brother. I don’t know.

So why am I bringing all of this up? Because of Chicken Marsala. It’s a dish I’ve been very fond of for years. It isn’t something I make all that often because I don’t keep a large stockpile of marsala wine on hand. Considering how much I love Chicken Marsala, though, you’d think I would. Marsala wine is relatively cheap. I’ll blame it on space. Plus it’s not a wine I actually drink, so that could be another factor. It doesn’t matter. That’s not the point. I’m just babbling for the sake of filling up space…for no reason.

Whatever.

Where was I going?

Basically, I’ve hit a hump (maybe bump is the better word but it’s Wednesday which is also hump day so let’s just stick with that) with this post. Not the recipe. That came out perfectly on the first try. This actual spiel about everything behind it. The why. The what. The where. The whodunnit. All that crap.

I started off talking about the restaurant I first discovered Chicken Marsala in. I then went off on a tangent about how first experiences of food help help your relationship with that dish. I scrapped those and then went back to the restaurant…and…I don’t know. I’m just not feeling anything.

So now I’m wondering, do I even need to write up anything? It’s my version of a classic recipe. I originally intended to mix in yogurt, but I was too lazy to go back to the store to get it and so I just used mayo instead and I was quite happy with the way it turned out. I used pasta to serve this but by itself, over rice, over quinoa, over roasted potatoes…any of that would work. That’s really all I have to say. But all of that is gravy. That’s all about why. Do I go and explain what Chicken Marsala is? This isn’t a cookbook (yet?).

In the end, all I care is that the food tastes good. That’s it.

So. Ummm. I guess that’s it.

On with the food?

Chicken Marsala
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A simple & easy spin on a class chicken, mushroom & wine dish.
Servings Prep Time
4 people 15 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
40 minutes 30 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 people 15 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
40 minutes 30 minutes
Chicken Marsala
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
A simple & easy spin on a class chicken, mushroom & wine dish.
Servings Prep Time
4 people 15 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
40 minutes 30 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 people 15 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
40 minutes 30 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: people
Units:
Instructions
  1. I make this in a dutch oven. It's not necessary, but I have a habit of stirring just a little too vigorously and end up flinging something out of the pan. You just need a wide pot/pan or sorts. Turn the heat on (about medium high) and drizzle in some olive oil (about 2 tablespoons).
  2. Whilst the oil is heating, dry your chicken tenders with paper towels and sprinkle with salt and pepper. You can do just one side of each (just be sure to put that side down into the oil first).
  3. Once dried and seasoned, add the chicken to the hot pan. If you only sprinkled one side, go ahead and season the other side of the chicken now. Otherwise, you're going to do nothing for about 5 minutes. Let the chicken sizzle away. Use tongs to give it a nudge after a bit. It's ready to flip (and repeat the process) once the chicken decides to stop clinging to the pan (if it's been a while and it's still sticking, carefully and forcefully flip it so that it doesn't burn).
  4. This is the other reason I use a dutch oven, the lid. When it's flipped upside down, it stands perfectly. I use that as a dish. So when the chicken is nicely browned on both sides, transfer the tenders to the lid (or dish).
  5. Without turning the heat off (just down to medium) add in the onions, lemon, thyme, savory and parsley. Give a decent sprinkle of salt and pepper and stir it about. If it looks really dry, add a bit more oil. Stir to coat every last strip of onion.
  6. After about 5 minutes, the onions will begin to soften and start to turn a little yellow. Now is the time to add in the celery. And again, add a pinch of salt and pepper.
  7. After another 5 minutes of wonderful cooking, the celery will start to soften and the onions will be even softer. Obviously. So now, go ahead and add in the garlic. Stir to incorporate and cook for about 1 minute.
  8. Now it's time to add in the onions and the dried sage. Again, season with salt and pepper. I usually just do a pinch. It makes a big difference. Trust me. Please. Anyways, stir it all in. It might look dry but the mushrooms are going to release a LOT of liquid. That's good.
  9. Let the liquid drain out of the mushrooms and into the pan. Then let that liquid slowly evaporate. Stir the mushrooms every now & then. This process can take about 15-20 minutes. Have a glass of wine. Sing to some Mariah. Or write a blog post.
  10. Once the liquid has left the building (or most of it), add in the marsala wine. Scrape up any browned bits on the bottom of the pan and around the edges with a wooden spoon.
  11. Add the browned chicken back in, along with any juices that collected on the dish (or lid, in my case). Bring back to a boil, clamp the lid on and turn the heat down to a medium low (or a high low?). Set a timer for 10 minutes.
  12. During this time, since I usually prepare this with pasta, I make sure the water is in a pot getting to a boil.
  13. After 10 minutes, take the lid off and stir in the mayonnaise and ground mustard. Let it all simmer for another 5 minutes.
  14. Check to make sure your chicken is fully cooked through (it more than likely is, but it's always better to check before you put it in your mouth).
  15. Serve!!!
Recipe Notes

*Pole to Pole
You know how an onion has the stringy bits coming out of one end? That's a pole. The opposite side is the other. Slice those off, cut the onion in half. Once peeled you can see the "grain" of the onion going in the direction of the poles. Slice WITH the "grain."

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