Recipes

Ginger & Rosemary Spiced Poached Pears

December 14, 2015

Ginger & Rosemary Spiced Poached Pears

I started writing this recipe post back in October. I had a grand plan. I was going to use this recipe as a way to illustrate that with just a basic recipe you can go off in a million different directions and how you could utilize nearly every other byproduct in another fashion. I wrote. And then I didn’t do anything. I didn’t feel all that inspired. I blame the far too long summer. Then, a really chilly day appeared and I strolled out to a coffee shop and sat outside, wearing a hat and vest and typed away. And then again, the post just sat there. Unfinished.

Then I sort of gave up. Not on the idea. But on making this that post. It’s something I need to work on in for the future. Something I really need to plan. Because the poached pear recipe below is used in a gingerbread cake that is perfect for the holidays. And so, I needed one of these up and with Christmas nearly here, it had to happen soon. So long story short, here’s a recipe for Poached Pears.

Poached Pears & Vanilla Ice Cream drizzled with molasses

But here are just a few things to keep in mind:

1. When you make this, if you cook it uncovered (like I do), the slow simmer of the spices and fruit will make your home smell AB-SO-LUTE-LY AH-MAH-ZING. If you’re having a holiday party, add in some booze, or substitute in some wine and you’ve got a dessert that will double as home fragrance AND a beverage.

2. Do NOT get rid of the liquid after the pears have been poached. Save it. Not only to reserve the pears in, but also to use in cocktails. Or just dilute with some water for a spiced beverage.

3. Adjust the amounts, the spices, the herbs of this to make it your own. Poaching pears are easy. Throw everything in a pot. Walk away. That’s it. That’s why this is a wonderful dish to whip up and make your own. No real recipe is needed…of course, I do recommend you use this one.

Add in water to make the poaching liquid a refreshing spiced drink (and maybe a little booze too)

Ginger & Rosemary Spiced Poached Pears
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Serve these gloriously silky spiced pears alone with molasses or some vanilla ice cream…or add to a cake…or just make for the liquid…or to make your home smell amazing. Really, just make these. You'll thank me later.
Servings Prep Time
6 pears 10 minutes
Cook Time
60-90 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6 pears 10 minutes
Cook Time
60-90 minutes
Ginger & Rosemary Spiced Poached Pears
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Serve these gloriously silky spiced pears alone with molasses or some vanilla ice cream…or add to a cake…or just make for the liquid…or to make your home smell amazing. Really, just make these. You'll thank me later.
Servings Prep Time
6 pears 10 minutes
Cook Time
60-90 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6 pears 10 minutes
Cook Time
60-90 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: pears
Units:
Instructions
  1. Find a large pot. In this pot, combine together the apple cider, water, dark brown sugar, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, fresh rosemary, zest and juice of the lemons and orange, sliced ginger and the vanilla (bean or extract). Give a stir to make sure no sugar is sticking to the bottom and put it on your stove. Turn the heat on high.
  2. Peel your bosc pears. Add them to the pot. If it's not bubbling or boiling or simmering yet, that's fine. Give them all a push and stir to get the pears submerged. They'll float up near the top and that's fine. When the liquid begins to bubble, adjust the heat to keep it at a simmer.
  3. Let the pears have a party in the most delicious smelling hot tub of all time for about an hour. After that hour, check on the pears. Grab a paring knife (no pun intended) and give one a stab. If it slides in really easily, it's done! If there's some resistance, let the pears relax away in the bubbling liquid a bit longer.
  4. The amount of time it will take the pears to cook depends on how ripe they are. The older and riper they are, the quicker they will poach. I always like to stop the simmering when they are JUST about done. There's a slight bit of resistance to them. Then, I turn off the heat and let them cool in the hot liquid until both are room temperature (or slightly warmer than room).
  5. If you don't have time for that, or you've cooked them and they are perfectly done, remove the pears with a slotted spoon and put in a bowl, let them sit uncovered to cool. Save the liquid, but put in an ice bath to bring the temperature down quickly. Once the liquid has cooled considerably (if you stir it while on ice, it will happen even quicker) you can add the pears back in…or put the pears in a tupperware and strain the poaching liquid over them until they are covered. Store in your fridge until ready to eat/use/whatever you plan on doing with them.
  6. As for that liquid. Save it. Use it for sorbet. Use it for drinks. Use it for rice pudding. Reduce it and make it into a syrup. Use it for caramel. Don't waste it. Add some water and drink it on its own.
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