Recipes

S’Mores Tart

September 3, 2015

S'mores Tart

The fact that I have a severe allergic reaction to Summer (also known as hatred) is no secret. Living in a city that beckons to tourists, the oncoming slought of vacation-goers who don’t know a thing about the city they’re in and crowd onto the trains pressing you up again strangers and people that smell like cumin, stop in doorways so you’re stuck out in the sweltering heat, stand in the middle of sidewalk as a crowd parts around them is increasingly annoying. Especially when you add in the temperature outside. You can walk outside and immediately run into a wall of heat that takes all of your energy away. That smile you woke up with? Gone. Dead. On the sidewall. Perspiration drips out of every pore just for being alive in this place at this very moment. Us Summer haters seek solace in our darkened and air conditioned apartments. The windows are boarded up with blinds and curtains, we don’t want any extra heat to find it’s way in. We avoiding doing errands so that we don’t have to crawl outside during the day to be beaten with the suns rays and get an unbearable burn.

No. I DON’T want to go the beach and be surrounded by screaming children, overly confident people wearing bathing suits that are far too small and too revealing and seagulls divebombing me for my food that’s currently covered in sand that I don’t even want anymore. I would rather be inside drinking a Gin & Tonic and binging the entire series of “The Good Wife” for the umpteenth time. Finding sand for days isn’t my idea of a good time. I also don’t really like having to swat off bees as I’m enjoying a cocktail outside. I don’t want to sweat. I do enough of that at work. How many more months until September? Make. It. Stop. Please.

S'mores Tart

All that being said, there are a few qualities of the summer season that I actually do find somewhat enjoyable. Backyard barbecues, hanging out by the pool drinking, sitting out on the deck (in the shade) reading in the morning, playing cards at night out on said deck. But, when you live in a third floor apartment with no private deck, no private pool and no private yard or garden…in a densely packed neighborhood…in a city, those enjoyable things are much harder to come by. But there is one activity that you can still sort of do. S’mores. You don’t need a grill or a fire (however, that does make it 100 times better). Graham crackers + chocolate pieces + marshmallows toasted over an open stove flame makes the S’mores you’ve come to know and love.

S'mores!

But do you love S’mores? I mean, yes, they’re good. But, I’ve gotten to the point in my life where I feel like they’re a bit overrated. Yes, it’s a delicious combination of graham cracker, chocolate and toasted marshmallow. The ingredients are cheap, it’s easy to prepare: just unwrap it all and make your guests make it themselves. You also get to play with fire. But here’s my problem with S’mores. They’re hard to eat. The chocolate never melts enough. The cracker crumbles right away. And then you get all stickey and gooey from the marshmallow. Some people will probably say that’s what half the fun about them is. You’re outside. It’s summer. Just hop in the pool or ocean to clean up. Yes, the smell of the fire is fantastic. But it’s messy. And if you’re like me, you don’t like messy. I love lobster, but I hate cracking the little bastards apart. That’s why I love lobster rolls. The work is all done. I just get to eat it right away.

So this anti-Summer, inside dwelling, cold seeking baker set out to make a version of S’mores that was easy to eat, not messy and just as delicious.

And that has happened. All in the form of a tart. Elegant enough for a dinner party, but easy enough to make just to indulge yourself. Seriously, you could. you could just cut down the recipe a bit to make it individual size.

Graham cracker crust

So as summer (FINALLY) comes to an end and I’m getting inspired by everything Autumn I’m seeing, I’m going to share this recipe with you. It’s pretty simple. I say that for everything. But it is. You might notice, however, that there are no marshmallows. But there is meringue. For those who don’t know, marshmallows are meringue with gelatin and left out to dry. So you know how you love the gooey marshmallow with S’mores? The meringue is all goo and no dry bits. However, if making meringue scares you, plop some marshmallows on top. Because why not. That would work.

Untorched S'mores Tart

One last note is that I don’t have a kitchen torch. I want one. I just don’t own one yet. So this recipes tells you how to torch your meringue without a torch. But if you’ve got a torch, use the torch. Because it’s fun.

S'mores Tart by the slice

S'mores Tart
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
The Summer dessert staple turned into a less messy, more elegant dessert.
Servings Prep Time
8 slices 30 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30 minutes 30 minutes
Servings Prep Time
8 slices 30 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30 minutes 30 minutes
S'mores Tart
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
The Summer dessert staple turned into a less messy, more elegant dessert.
Servings Prep Time
8 slices 30 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30 minutes 30 minutes
Servings Prep Time
8 slices 30 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30 minutes 30 minutes
Ingredients
Graham Cracker Crust
Chocolate Filling
Italian Meringue
Servings: slices
Units:
Instructions
Crust
  1. In a medium size bowl, combine both the graham cracker crumbs and the sugar. Mix well to disperse the sugar.
  2. Melt the butter. Either on the stove, in the microwave or another way of your choosing. Life should have choices. This is one of them.
  3. Add about 3/4 of the melted butter to the graham cracker mixture and stir to combine. Grab a small amount with your hands and press. If it holds together nicely, you're all set. If it still feels loose, add in a little more butter and mix and then test again.
  4. Once the crumb mixture has reached the right consistency, dump it into a 9-inch fluted tart pan with a removable bottom. There is no need to grease this. Using your hands of the bottom of a measuring cup, press the buttery crumbs into an even layer over the bottom and up the sides, make sure it's packed very tight. Remove any excess. Transfer to the fridge until the filling is ready.
Filling
  1. Preheat the oven to 250ºF.
  2. Chop your chocolate into small pieces. The smaller they are, the quicker they will melt. If the pieces are too large, you may have to heat everything up again just to melt them. And that's annoying. So think small. Put all those small pieces of chocolate in a bowl that will also be seeing the addition of the heavy cream.
  3. But before you add the heavy cream, you want to heat it up. So put the heavy cream into a pot along with the salt and coffee. Mix to combine and turn the heat on. Heating heavy cream is funny. It seems to do nothing for a while, then all of a sudden it's hot. If you walk away, you can easily end up with a mess. So don't go too far or get too distracted.
  4. The cream is ready when you look around the edges and you see little bubble starting to pop up. You now want to take this hot cream and pour it over your chocolate. The chocolate will start to melt right away. But let it sit for a minute or two. Wait five if you feel like it.
  5. After you've waited the necessary amount of time, grab a small spatula and carefully stir together. You can use a whisk if you like, but you also risk adding in a little too much air and that will effect the final texture, which is why I like to stick with my good friend, Spatula.
  6. When the mixture is nice and smooth, add in the butter. Mix until you see no more butter lumps.
  7. Now add in the egg yolks and, again, mix until it's all incorporated.
  8. Place a mesh strainer over a bowl and pour the chocolate mixture into the sieve. Use the spatula to press it through. This will remove any random pieces of chocolate that didn't melt, coffee granules and any egg that may have accidentally cooked. Remember to scrape the bottom of the strainer to get every last bit off.
  9. Pour the filling into the chilled tart shell and use an offset spatula or the back of a spoon to spread it out evenly. Drop the tart a few times to remove any air bubbles. Any that come to the surface can be popped with a toothpick.
  10. Place the filled tart on a sheet pan and pop into the center of the oven and let it slowly bake away for 25-30 minutes.
  11. It will be set around the edges and a little jiggly in the center. Let it cool completely on a wire rack before transferring to the fridge to rest overnight.
Topping
  1. Heat your broiler to high. Make sure you have a rack up towards the top (depending on how high you pile your meringue, you may have to adjust it later). Remove the tart from the fridge.
  2. Place the reserved egg whites in the bowl of a mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Set aside.
  3. In a small pot, pour in the water and then the sugar (this is just added insurance that no sugar will be stuck to bottom of pot and will burn). Stir to combine.
  4. Turn the heat on to high.
  5. Fill a cup with water and grab a pastry brush. Dip the brush in water and then brush the inside walls of the pot with the water. This will make any sugar that stuck to the sides drizzle back into the mixture and be boiled to perfection.
  6. Depending on the pot you chose and the strength of the flame, reaching the final temperature of 240ºF can take anywhere from 3–5 minutes. So keep a thermometer nearby (I've found that for this amount, a candy thermometer doesn't reach into the pot enough so I just use an instant read thermometer).
  7. While that is boiling away, being whipping your egg whites. You want them very frothy. No yellow tint left. If this happens before your syrup is ready, just turn the mixer down to stir.
  8. When the sugar and water reach 240ºF, turn the heat off and to the mixer to low. Slowly drizzle the syrup in. You want it to be betwixt the side and the whisk. If it hits the whisk, it will splash, if it hits the side for too long (as in, if you drizzle it from the very top of the side) it will cool. So just rest the edge of the pot and slowly pour it in in a thin stream.
  9. Once it's all added, turn the mixer up to high and whisk away.
  10. When it begins to look extremely white and pearlescent, add in the salt and vanilla and mix for just a few seconds longer. Take the whisk off, give it a stir and pull the whisk out. Flip it upside down. If the the peaks of the meringue stand straight up and fall over just a tiny bit, it's ready. If it's still really droopy, just whip it for a little longer until it reaches this stage.
  11. Pile the meringue on top of the tart however you want. You can use a piping bag or you can just spread it on top using a spatula. Just cover all the chocolate.
  12. Once you've meringued your tart, place it on a tray (still in the tart shell) and pop it under the broiler. Keep a close eye on it. I didn't even close the oven door. It will start to brown after about 30 seconds. Turn it to brown it all over. Remove from the oven and let cool a minute or two until ready to handle.
  13. It's time to eat!!
Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe

You Might Also Like